Bed Bug FAQS
Bed Bugs: Unwanted Travellers 
Fossilised Fleas
Fossilised Fleas
Bed Bug FAQS
Bed Bugs: Unwanted Travellers 
Fossilised Fleas
Fossilised Fleas

An itchy time in the trenches 

Fleas were a major problem for soldiers during World War I, particularly in the trenches where soldiers spent long periods of time in close quarters with each other and with animals. Fleas were commonly found on rats, which were abundant in the trenches, as well as on the clothing and bedding of soldiers.

How Soldiers Were Affected By Fleas

The bites of fleas caused significant discomfort and irritation for soldiers, leading to constant scratching and itching. In addition to the physical discomfort, fleas also carried a range of diseases, including typhus and trench fever, which could be deadly for soldiers.

To address the problem of fleas, soldiers were instructed to regularly wash their clothing and bedding, and to use insecticidal powders and sprays on themselves and their belongings. However, these measures were often ineffective, and many soldiers continued to suffer from flea infestations throughout the war.

The Impact Of Fleas In The Trenches

The impact of fleas on soldiers during World War I highlights the importance of effective flea control measures, particularly in situations where large numbers of people are living in close quarters with each other and with animals. While modern methods of flea control have significantly improved since the time of the war, the importance of regular cleaning and preventative measures remains crucial in preventing infestations.

By taking proactive steps to control fleas, soldiers and other individuals can reduce the risk of infestation and promote good hygiene practices, reducing the spread of disease and improving overall health and well-being.

If you have a problem with any type of pest contact that needs professional treatment contact us below or call us on 07443 052851, and our experienced, friendly team will offer advice and provide an effective solution.