Fleas
Fleas and Your Mental Health
Muntjac Deer in Britain
Muntjac Deer in Britain
Fleas
Fleas and Your Mental Health
Muntjac Deer in Britain
Muntjac Deer in Britain

Chinese Water Deer

The introduction of non-native species to an ecosystem can have serious consequences on the local flora and fauna. The Chinese water deer is one such species that was introduced to Britain in the late 19th century. Originally introduced for ornamental purposes, the Chinese water deer has since established itself as a pest species with a significant impact on the environment.

Introduced To The UK

Chinese water deer are small deer, native to China and Korea. They were first introduced to Britain in the late 19th century when a pair of deer were imported to Woburn Park in Bedfordshire. However, it wasn't until the 1940s that they began to establish themselves in the wild. Chinese water deer are now found in several areas of England, including East Anglia and the Midlands.

The Problem With Chinese Water Deer

The Chinese water deer is a herbivore and feeds mainly on leaves, shoots, and grasses. Their feeding habits have a significant impact on the environment, and they are known to cause extensive damage to crops, trees, and vegetation. They have been known to damage young trees and crops by eating the bark and stems, which can lead to stunted growth or even death of the plant.

Chinese water deer are also known to cause damage to riverbanks and wetland habitats. Their grazing habits can cause erosion of riverbanks, leading to an increase in sediment in the water, which can negatively impact the aquatic ecosystem. The deer's grazing can also lead to the destruction of wetland habitats, which are crucial for a variety of plant and animal species.

Due to their destructive impact on the environment, Chinese water deer are considered a pest species in Britain. They have no natural predators in the UK, and their population has been steadily increasing. In response, several measures have been taken to control their population.

How Chinese Water Deer Are Controlled

One method of control is through culling. This involves the systematic killing of deer to reduce their numbers. Culling can be done through shooting or trapping, and it is often carried out by trained professionals. In some cases, deer are culled to protect crops and vegetation, while in other cases, it is done to protect the habitat of other species.

Chinese water deer are also hunted for sport, which has led to their decline in some areas. However, hunting can also lead to an increase in deer populations, as hunters often release deer into new areas for sport.

In conclusion, the introduction of the Chinese water deer to Britain has had a significant impact on the environment. Their grazing habits and destructive impact on riverbanks and wetland habitats have led to their classification as a pest species. The control methods used, such as culling and hunting, have had mixed success in reducing their population. It is important to continue monitoring their impact on the environment and implementing effective control measures to prevent further damage.


If you have a problem with Chinese water deer or any other type of pest contact that needs professional treatment contact us below or call us on 07443 052851, and our experienced, friendly team will offer advice and provide an effective solution.