Bedbugs pest control
A History Of Bedbugs In Britain
The Asian Hornet From The East
The Hornet From The East
Bedbugs pest control
A History Of Bedbugs In Britain
The Asian Hornet From The East
The Hornet From The East

Honeybee Swarms

As spring approaches, honey bees begin their swarming behaviour, which is the process of a colony of bees splitting into two separate colonies. While this may seem like an intimidating process, it’s actually a natural and necessary part of a healthy hive’s growth and reproduction.

Swarming Process

During the swarming process, the queen bee and a large group of worker bees will leave the hive in search of a new location to start a new colony. They will gather in a temporary location, such as a tree branch or bush, while scout bees search for a suitable new home. Once a new location is found, the swarm will move to their new home and begin building a new hive.

Encountering Honey Bee Swarm

It’s important to note that swarming honey bees are not the same as wasps. While wasps can be aggressive and pose a threat to humans, swarming bees are generally docile and not looking to sting anyone. In fact, when bees are swarming, they are more concerned with finding a new home and protecting their queen than they are with attacking people.

However, it’s still important to exercise caution around a swarm of bees. If you come across a swarm, it’s best to keep your distance and contact a local beekeeper or pest control professional who can safely remove the swarm and relocate it to a more suitable location.

Wasp Vs The Honey bee

To avoid confusion between bees and wasps, there are a few key things to look out for. Bees have a rounder, more robust body shape than wasps, and are covered in hair. Their colouring can vary, but is generally brown or black with yellow or orange stripes. Wasps, on the other hand, have a more slender body shape and a smooth, shiny appearance. They are typically bright yellow with black stripes.

Additionally, bees are more likely to be seen gathering pollen from flowers, whereas wasps are more likely to be found scavenging for food, such as sugary drinks and other sweet substances.

Honey Bee Conclusion

In summary, swarming behaviour in honey bees is a natural and necessary process for colony growth and reproduction, and is generally not a cause for concern. However, it’s important to exercise caution around swarms and to know the difference between bees and wasps to avoid any potential risks. If you have any concerns or questions, it’s best to contact a local beekeeper or pest control professional for assistance.

If you have a problem with wasps or any other type of pest contact that needs professional treatment contact us below or call us on 07443 052851, and our experienced, friendly team will offer advice and provide an effective solution.